Tips for Maintaining Balanced Nutrition For the Elderly

By Jason A Smail | Health

Apr 13

Not only physical changes, changes in senses and perceptions such as sensitivity to taste, smell, even hearing and vision are also factors that affect the fulfillment of nutrition of the elderly. One of the common perception-related problems in the elderly is the lack of taste buds. When a person’s ability to taste flavor diminishes, the food may feel bland or bitter, so it tends to add spices such as salt or flavor to the diet, whereas salt and flavoring include those that must be restricted to the elderly. The decrease in olfactory function also affects how they choose the type of food. To take care your parents or grandparents needs, you can use our home health care service.

What are the nutritional needs of the elderly? For example, in women aged 50-64 years, the energy requirement per day is 1900 kcal, smaller about 300 calories when compared to the energy needs of adults aged 19-29 years. Another significant change is the need for fat and carbohydrates. In adults the fat needs of 60-75 grams per day, while the elderly need only 43-53 grams of fat alone. The majority of nutritional needs of macronutrients (such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins) in the elderly decrease with increasing age. But in micronutrient nutrients (such as vitamins and minerals) tend to be unchanged, only sodium should be reduced as the age increases.

1. Get used to consume sources of calcium
Calcium plays a role to maintain bone health and strength. In the elderly, bone density begins to decrease so that the risk of causing bone and tooth loss. Elderly is recommended to consume foods rich in calcium and vitamin D such as fish and milk. Often exposed to the morning sun can also help the formation of vitamin D in the body.

2. Get used to eating fibrous foods
Constipation is one of the digestive problems that are often experienced by the elderly. Reduced consumption of fruit vegetables in the elderly become one of the causes. Sometimes hard fruits or vegetables that are too fibrous make elderly difficulty consuming fruit vegetables, thus limiting the elderly to get enough fruit vegetable intake. In addition to fruit vegetables, elderly can consume whole grain products are also high in fiber. Fiber is important for the health of the elderly because, in addition to digestion, fiber also serves to control the levels of fat and sugar in the blood.

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